O, Me. O, Life: Some Thoughts About Getting Back Into the Classroom

A year ago when I had to abruptly give up teaching due to the sudden onset of a terrible bout of anxiety and depression, I doubted that I would ever go back into a classroom again. Now that I'm feeling better, and am ready to get back to teaching, I've been doing a lot of … Continue reading O, Me. O, Life: Some Thoughts About Getting Back Into the Classroom

A Selfless Act of Love: The Critical Nature of Asceticism in “Sir Orfeo”

In his prideful attempt to control the outcome of events that are beyond his control, Orfeo loses the thing which means most to him in the world—his true love. His unwillingness to heed Heurodis’ warnings about the danger and futility of trying to save her from the fairy king leads to his ultimate downfall. Orfeo’s … Continue reading A Selfless Act of Love: The Critical Nature of Asceticism in “Sir Orfeo”

Obedience Unto Absurdity: Griselda’s Failure as a Wife in “The Clerk’s Tale”

The ingredients for a healthy marriage have been at issue as long as the idea of marriage has existed. In “The Clerk’s Tale,” Geoffrey Chaucer challenges readers’ perceptions of the marriage ideal, especially in the context of courtly love. While Griselda is of lower social station than Walter, how far does her obligation to obedience … Continue reading Obedience Unto Absurdity: Griselda’s Failure as a Wife in “The Clerk’s Tale”

There Is None So [Happy]: The Importance of Honesty in Chaucer’s “The Merchant’s Tale”

While there is no question that love and physical compatibility are of paramount importance for a healthy marriage, they are not exclusive requirements. In “The Merchant’s Tale”, Geoffrey Chaucer presents readers with problems that arise when necessary virtues are missing from a marital relationship. Through their distrust and betrayal of one another, Januarie and May … Continue reading There Is None So [Happy]: The Importance of Honesty in Chaucer’s “The Merchant’s Tale”

Rich Man, Poor Man: A Short Reflection on Thoreau’s “Where I Lived and What I Lived For”

In "Where I Lived and What I Lived For," Thoreau teaches us a great lesson on the importance of contentedness. While he is always moving--sauntering, as it were--he is never doing so in search of wealth; at least not monetary wealth. Instead, his constant forward movement is in search of purpose and higher understanding of … Continue reading Rich Man, Poor Man: A Short Reflection on Thoreau’s “Where I Lived and What I Lived For”