A little wit. A little wisdom. And a little whatever. Your daily dose of humor, of words that hopefully make a difference, and of some of the trivia that floats around in my brain all the time. I hope these posts bring some levity and light into your day. As always, if you like it, please hit the like button below (yes, you’ll be asked for your email address, but you’re NOT signing up for anything…I promise), and most importantly share, Share, SHARE!! I’d really appreciate it if you did. 🙂

pers_zalkovsky_iraq_lgA Little Wit

Be all that you can be…(from SurferSam.com)

The teacher gave her fifth grade class an assignment: Get their parents to tell them a story with a moral at the end of it.

The next day the kids came back and one by one began to tell their stories.

“Johnny, do you have a story to share?” the teacher asked.

“Yes ma’am. My daddy told a story about my Aunt Karen. She was a pilot in the Iraq war and her plane got hit.

She had to bail out over enemy territory and all she had was a small flask of whiskey, a pistol and a survival knife.

She drank the whiskey on the way down so it wouldn’t break and then her parachute landed right in the middle of twenty enemy troops.

She shot fifteen of them with the gun until she ran out of bullets, killed four more with the knife, till the blade broke, and then she killed the last Iraqi with her bare hands.”

“Good Heavens” said the horrified teacher. “What kind of moral did your daddy tell you from this horrible story?”

“Stay the heck away from Aunt Karen when she’s drinking!”


james-baldwinA Little Wisdom

“The price one pays for pursuing any profession or calling is an intimate knowledge of its ugly side.” –James Baldwin, 1924-1987 (Read more about him.)


plutoA Little Whatever

On February 18, 1930, astronomer Clyde W. Tombaugh, working at the Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Arizona, discovered the ninth planet in our solar system, Pluto. Its discovery and existence was publicly announced on March 13, 1930, the anniversary of Percival Lowell, who first theorized the existence of a ninth planet (it was also the anniversary of William Herschel’s discovery of Uranus). Pluto’s status as a planet fell into question in 1992 following the discovery of several objects of similar size in the Kuiper belt, the region of the outer solar system where Pluto exists. In 2006, the International Astronomical Union announced that Pluto would no longer be considered a planet, and was reclassified a dwarf planet. In 2015, NASA’s New Horizon spacecraft passed closer to Pluto than any spacecraft ever had and returned new photos and scientific data about the dwarf plant, providing a completely new perspective for scientists.

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