A little wit. A little wisdom. And a little whatever. Your daily dose of humor, of words that hopefully make a difference, and of some of the trivia that floats around in my brain all the time. I hope these posts bring some levity and light into your day. As always, if you like it, please hit the like button below (yes, you’ll be asked for your email address, but you’re NOT signing up for anything…I promise), and most importantly share, Share, SHARE!! I’d really appreciate it if you did. 🙂

cupid2A Little Wit

Here, hold my chickens…(from SurferSam.com)

One day, Farmer Jones was in town picking up supplies for his farm. He stopped by the hardware store and picked up a bucket and an anvil. Then, he stopped by the livestock dealer to buy a couple of chickens and a goose. However, he now had a problem: How to carry all of his purchases home?

The livestock dealer said, “Why don’t you put the anvil in the bucket, carry the bucket in one hand, put a chicken under each arm and carry the goose in your other hand?”

“Hey, thanks!” the farmer said, and off he went.

While walking he met a little old lady who told him she was lost. She asked, “Can you tell me how to get to 1515 Mockingbird Lane?”

The farmer said, “Well, as a matter of fact, I live at 1520 Mockingbird Lane. Let’s take my short cut and go down this alley. We’ll be there in no time.”

The little old lady said, “I am a lonely widow without a husband to defend me. How do I know that when we get into the alley you won’t take advantage of me?”

The farmer said, “Heck, lady! I am carrying a bucket, an anvil, two chickens, and a goose. How in God’s name could I possibly do that?”

The little old lady said, “Set the goose down, cover him with the bucket, put the anvil on top of the bucket, and I’ll hold the chickens.”


cupid2A Little Wisdom

“It is assumed that the woman must wait, motionless, until she is wooed. That is how the spider waits for the fly.” –George Bernard Shaw, 1856-1950 (Read more about him.)


cupid2A Little Whatever

14 Pieces of Brain Candy for you, from me on Valentine’s Day! (Courtesy of Corsinet.com)

  1. 15% of U.S. women send themselves flowers on Valentine’s Day.
  2. 73% of people who buy flowers for Valentine’s Day are men.
  3. About 1 billion Valentine’s Day cards are exchanged each year. That’s the largest seasonal card-sending occasion of the year, next to Christmas.
  4. About 3% of pet owners will give Valentine’s Day gifts to their pets.
  5. Alexander Graham Bell applied for his patent on the telephone, an “Improvement in Telegraphy”, on Valentine’s Day, 1876.
  6. California produces 60 percent of American roses, but the vast number sold on Valentine’s Day in the United States are imported, mostly from South America. Approximately 110 million roses, the majority red, will be sold and delivered within a three-day time period.
  7. Cupid, another symbol of Valentines Day, became associated with it because he was the son of Venus, the Roman god of love and beauty. Cupid often appears on Valentine cards holding a bow and arrows because he is believed to use magical arrows to inspire feelings of love.
  8. During the late 1800s, postage rates around the world dropped, and the obscene St. Valentine’s Day card became popular, despite the Victorian era being otherwise very prudish. As the numbers of racy valentines grew, several countries banned the practice of exchanging Valentine’s Days cards. During this period, Chicago’s post office rejected more than 25,000 cards on the grounds that they were so indecent, they were not fit to be carried through the U.S. mail.
  9. During the Middle Ages, the belief that birds chose their mates on St. Valentine’s Day led to the idea that boys and girls would do the same. Up through the early 1900s, the Ozark hill people in the eastern United States thought that birds and rabbits started mating on February 14, a day for them which was not only Valentine’s Day but Groundhog Day as well.
  10. February 14, 270 A.D. : Roman Emperor Claudius II, dubbed “Claudius the Cruel,” beheaded a priest named Valentine for performing marriage ceremonies. Claudius II had outlawed marriages when Roman men began refusing to go to war in order to stay with their wives.
  11. Hallmark has over 1330 different cards specifically for Valentine’s Day.
  12. Humorous valentines of the 19th century were called “Vinegar Valentines” or “Penny Dreadfuls.” Vinegar Valentines were introduced in 1858 by John McLaughin, a Scotsman with a New York City Publishing Business. Penny Dreadfuls with comic designs drawn in 1870 by American cartoonists Charles Howard became known as Penny Dreadfuls.
  13. In 1929 in Chicago, gunmen in the suspected employment of organized-crime boss Al Capone murder seven members of the George “Bugs” Moran North Siders gang in a garage on North Clark Street. The so-called St. Valentine’s Day Massacre stirred a media storm centered on Capone and his illegal Prohibition-era activities and motivated federal authorities to redouble their efforts to find evidence incriminating enough to take him off the streets.
  14. In the Middle Ages, young men and women drew names from a bowl to see who their valentines would be. They would wear these names on their sleeves for one week. To wear your heart on your sleeve now means that it is easy for other people to know how you are feeling.
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2 thoughts on “A little wit. A little wisdom. And a little whatever. (February 14, 2017)

    1. You and everyone else I know! lol …As for me, well I’m a little cynical about VD (I have a post from last year about it). So I don’t struggle with cards and gifts so much. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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