I started writing stories when I was 10 years old–probably before that, actually, but that’s as early as I can remember. I did most of my growing up in a small town in East Texas where there wasn’t a whole lot to do, so my sister and I learned to use our imaginations early on. Mine seemed to always find its way to paper. I remember how excited I was once to use the $2 I had saved at the local five-and-dime store, Perry Bros., to buy whatever I wanted. The toy aisle in that store was amazing! But, I passed all of the cars, trucks, airplanes, spaceships, action figures, balls and gloves and bought a red spiral notebook and a package of pencils. I used that spiral for a long time and wrote a lot of stories in it. I kept it well into adulthood until it was lost during a move. That was 35 years ago. . .I’ve traded little spiral notebooks and pencils for a keyboard and monitor, but the tools are the only thing that has changed.

I wanted to write then. I want to write now.IMG_1303

Last night I updated my work information on Facebook to indicate that I’d started working as a freelance writer and blogger–you know, I made it “Facebook official.” All kidding aside, though, the symbolism is important to me. I made public a decision which I came to privately some time ago and I did it because I know that putting it out into the world makes me responsible for it. (Does that make sense to anyone but me?)

A friend asked if I wasn’t teaching anymore. . .

I love teaching. I love my students. I love watching them learn and discover and grow. If I may be so bold. . .I’m a damn good teacher! I’m sure that teaching will always be a part of my life in some way, so don’t read this and assume I’m giving it up; but things are changing for me. I won’t take any time here to bemoan the state of education in our country–I’m not an expert and this is not the forum. What I will say is that there are things that I see which are of grave concern to me. Being a teacher doesn’t mean what it used to mean. I am resigning my current teaching position effective at the end of this school year. I don’t know what the future holds for me where teaching is concerned.

What does this all mean?

Sometimes we are forced to follow our dreams because we’ve tried everything else and there’s nothing left to try. That’s sorta where I am. I’ve been and done everything except the one thing that I’ve always wanted to be and do. There’s nothing left to do but that. I’ll get into this in more detail in a later post.

I’ll admit it–I’m scared. The difference between talking about dreams and actually following them is monumental. There is a vast ocean of uncertainty staring me in the face and I’m not crazy about swimming. (Great metaphor, right? See, I write good. 🙂 ) I know that this will be a slow process and that defining “success” as a writer is a tricky proposition. I don’t expect or desire fame. I don’t expect to get rich. But, I’ve been told that making a living doing the thing you love is the best feeling in the world. I will be happy with that. So, here I am. . .

I wanted to write then. I want to write now.

I am a writer.

Ciao for now!

Jason

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11 thoughts on “Sometimes We Must Be Forced to Follow Our Dreams (I Am a Writer, Part I)

  1. Jason, I’ve always admired what a great writer you are brother. God has set ablaze in your heart — expressing your thoughts and emotions through words.

    Even if just one person is impacted by your writing and transparency, it’s more then worth seriously pursuing. You my friend are a blessing! 🙂

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  2. I’m really happy for you man, remember if you ever want to write something for my site too I’ll publish it. I really admire you for being able to just say you’re a writer too without any reservation. I usually tell people I’m a tutor or a teacher because sometimes it feels like if I told people I’m a writer they wouldn’t take me seriously. But you,, you’re doing it and owning it and I wish you all the luck in the world man.

    This world is rich for the people such as you who live in it.
    Hugs & Kisses

    Jammer

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Jammer…wow…I don’t even know what to say. Your words mean so much to me. You ARE a writer, and one whom I admired a lot. So, coming from you….I just don’t know how to say thanks! And I DEFINITELY want to contribute to your blog, and you are welcome on mine any time!

      Love you man!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Jason!! You are SOOOOOO right!! Perry Bros had THE BEST toy aisle!!!!! I think of Perry Brother’s often!! I really do! Also, W & W Variety had some unusual stuff/junk too and I still have it and I’m 54 years old!!! My grown children were sad just the other day when a little glass dog I had from W & W Variety fell and broke!! Sad that all the old stores in GS are long gone but happy that people like you and I have fond memories of them. Keep writing!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Donna, W&W was such a cool store! Do you remember how the floors squeaked when you walked on them? I wrote a piece for the GS Sun about 10 years ago about all those places. I need to post it here.

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      1. Yep, I sure do remember those floors!! It was a unique store. I really think it was my favorite, although Perry Bros, Darby’s, K Woolen’s and Jarvis’ were great too. Do you remember the UPSTAIRS in Jarvis’ where you could see over the balcony and the lady, Mrs. Genelle Crocker, was doing alterations on clothes? When Edward Denton passed away and we were cleaning out his house, we found a brand new pair of overalls that still had the K-Woolen’s price tag on it. The little white tag that was pinned on. I told everybody those overalls should go in the museum! Ha ha

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I remember the upstairs. Jennifer and I were always admonished not to go up there because we’d “bother” her while she was working. We still managed to sneak up a time or two…she never seemed bothered. lol Great story about the overalls! Museum worthy for sure!

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